Models for Localization

Models for Localization

Down the road from where I sit writing this post, a prudent example of localization and education is taking root at Samuel Staples Elementary School in Easton CT. This month, the town activated a ground mounted solar array capable of providing one half of the schools electricity needs. The project was financed entirely by the CT Green Bank and is phase one of a plan to make Samuel Staples the first fully solar powered school in Connecticut.

The story illustrates many fine points in the story for sustainability.

For one, the Easton school’s renewable energy aspirations are more of a next step than a first one.

The school already recognized the educational benefits of displaying food systems front and center in the eyes of young minds. For years, the school has leased school grounds to farmers for a wide variety of crops. This is an early imprint for young minds on where food comes from and possibly how it should be grown. Food that comes from the community travels less and is often organic lending itself to high nutritional density, health benefits and a reduction in spending on imported food.

With renewable energy, Samuel Staples is taking the next logical step to localizing its energy dividend as well. The school receives a lower energy bill, higher energy security and can point to the installation as a foundation of the local economy.

How the project was financed is another illustrative point for our evolution towards sustainability.

The Connecticut Green Bank, like its New York counterpart, represents the next step in circumventional finance in a sound strategy of localization. The Green Bank model is designed to stimulate private capital into infrastructure investments in clean energy and technology. I’d like to see that mandate expanded to food systems as both food and energy systems are the foundation of stable economies and societies. Regardless, the green bank model is proving to be successful in its early stages in forging private-public partnerships and in going it alone for smaller project like the Samuel Staples ground array.

The Green Bank model targets market rate investment returns to maintain capital preservation and re-invest returns. The school and town building model is a prudent one because the Green Bank, in theory, knows a lot about its counterparty and each participant has a vested interest in the others success.

Green Banks’ are tasked with investing in technology and infrastructure that is proven and typical enjoys a long life of paying dividends to all stakeholders. In the case of Easton’s solar array, the asset should offer energy savings and returns to investors for 25 years or more. Also, those returns are highly predicable and not subject to economic volatility outside of the town’s border.

Shouldn’t we be doing this at all our schools and on every town building? If we can invest public money at a market rate of return; if the investments create jobs and contribute to establishment of a low-carbon asset base; the answer becomes obvious rather quickly. Even ignoring environmental and health benefits completely; the economic arguments to localize our food and energy dividends stand on their own.

Returning to the education benefit. Isn’t this the type of thing we should be teaching our children? I imagine a young child looking to his father and pointing to the fields of food and the solar panels powering the school, “What’s that Daddy?” He asks.

The dad smiles and replies, “That’s the economy son and it’s our future.”

For more on the CT Green Bank – click here

Future Bright: The CT Green Bank should raise a dedicated fund and allow savers and private investors to participate in renewable energy build out for all schools in Connecticut. Later iterations of this series vehicle could include vertical farming infrastructure, design and local textile manufacturing and more.

SSE

Disclosure: Future Bright is a think tank and advisory in sustainability and investing. Future Bright has worked with renewable energy developers, energy efficiency funds, assets managers and vertical farmers on progressing solutions towards sustainability. This note is not an offer of services or investment of any kind. This is a blog post for informational purposes only. Those interested in consulting services, design work or industry analysis should contact Future Bright directly. (www.futurebrightblog.com)

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